What companies are Facebookers leaving for?

Now that Facebook has “quietly” IPO’d, it’s time for Suck to train his army of engineers on more meaningful pursuits. @elonmusk is a good role model. After Paypal, he’s been working on Tesla and SpaceX. Tesla has made electric cars sexy again and SpaceX just launched a Dragon. Granted, the movie “Social Network” was pretty good and it used to be fun thinking of Facebook as David fighting the Goliath, Google. But now, the rebels have become the Evil Empire. What companies are Facebookers leaving for?

Every Startup Needs a Gong

This is our third gong. Our first one was a few inches in diameter and sat on a desk. Our second one is about six inches in diameter–a mini version of this beast, which vibrates your soul if you stand too close. Gongs are a meme at Badgeville–a unique story about our company just like “Team Punishment” and Iceland. We hit the gong whenever sales closes a deal and the size of the deal determines the number of gongs (and now also what size gong you hit). Other companies also does this for sales. I hear New Relic gongs and sends a mass email to the entire company when a client goes premium (awkward and funny story around that). I love the gongs because they’re a tangible reminder of progress. As an engineer living in a world of 0-downtime releases and in the past weekly or even daily releases, there’s no party to commemorate the mailing of CDs with your software. Somewhere out there, some VMs turn over in a dark, temperature-controlled room and your SaaS product has been updated.

Gongs are one of the many ways companies develop culture and character. Our name is “Team Punishment”. The origin of the name is oh-so-random but it’s stuck nonetheless. Every quarter we design t-shirts to commemorate the evolution of “Team Punishment”–recent ones featured images from the Godfather and Scarface. I remember one quarter we had one w/ a japanese phrase translated as “team with no worthy enemies”. As we’ve grown to over 50 employees and moved 4 offices and now occupy a fifth across the street, it’s the little things like gongs and team names and backstories that pass on the culture, the essence of the company. The space-time continuum in a startup is compressed–years feel like months and weeks feel like days. It’s very easy to get caught up in Getting Stuff Done (GSD), but it’s these tiny details that help tell the story of your company.

Why Google is Dying to be More Social

It’s tiring to hear that Google doesn’t have “social” in its DNA. I left a comment on the article, but I must elaborate on this battle of epic proportions happening in the tech world.

Arrogance is a Ruse

Google is or can be perceived as being arrogant. It’s unlikely that a company that has transformed the world as Google has can avoid a tinge of arrogance. Hence, it is naive to think that Google’s attempts at “social”, namely Google+, are merely whimsical dalliances of an aging giant. I don’t think anyone at Shoreline realistically thinks Google+ will ever overtake Facebook. The arrogance is a ruse to throw us off the scent–the smell of deepening fear.

Beyond PageRank and Wide Open Spaces

Google’s stated mission is to “organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful”. When what all the world knew was Yahoo’s labyrinthian category hierarchy, Google’s algorithm for indexing and searching the growing sea of information was a quite a paradigm shift. This approach is still dominant today but the sea itself is changing. The Internet used to give Google free reign to crawl and index. Today, with digital fortresses like social networks and pay walls, it’s become more and more difficult for Google to complete its mission. For a while, Google had a deal to incorporate tweets into their search results. As of late, the relationship is still strained. Then there was the whole Google-Facebook address book debacle. More and more, the world’s information has evolved from merely flat web pages to intricate graphs containing not only people but brands, topics, and even pets. Companies like Badgeville and lately Facebook as well, go further, building “behavior graphs” where the connections between the content are rich verbs like “watched”, “purchased”, and “performed”.

Social or Bust

Google’s frustration is apparent and with good reason. Think back to Google’s ordeal with the Chinese government last year. The situation is different, but the problem is the same: the world is not as open as Google likes. The government writes the rules in China and Google must operate by them. It took Google a while to realize that. The same battle rages on between Android and iPhone. For better or worse, Apple keeps tight control over its iWorld. Some people like that approach, but for the rest of the market, Android is bringing order to the chaos. Google+ is an attempt to break down yet another set of barriers in another arena. It’s the counterweight to Facebook and its unique way of looking at the world. Whether or not you believe what Google believes, you should respect them for sticking to the mission, even if they don’t always clearly articulate them. However, you really have to wonder how Google will organize the world’s information when it has no access to large portions of it. Or perhaps what will happen if Google stopped fighting these fights.